World Financial Centre New York United States

The events of 9/11 give this venue a profound significance. Of the music, Robert offers these insights from his personal diary published here for the first time. [endtease]

Thursday night 30th. November, 2000; 01.05
Chez Brainin, NJ.
I love this space. At lunch equipment problems three times in a row forced me to go in another musical direction to the one intended. I trust when this happens, so I followed where it lead. This evening, I continued in the same direction. Interestingly, I was unable to push the music somewhere else. Technical concerns aside, something was going on.

Tuesday 19th. April, 2005; 09.41
DGM HQ, Wiltshire, England.
In personal remembrance of my professional life, the performances in the Atrium of the World Financial Center have continued to resonate as something of an event. To decline an invitation to re-open the reconstructed Atrium in 2003, while King Crimson was touring, was a matter of deep regret.The privilege of playing music within this remarkable space was balanced by extraordinary demands for photography, autography, filming, recording and forms of personal attention. It seems that, to present much of anything in a public context, is an unlikely undertaking. Nevertheless, I persist.

AUDIO SOURCE: Board Recording

DGM AUDIO QUALITY

AVERAGE CUSTOMER RATING

TRACK
TIME
01
Paradise
18:28
02
Paradise Lost
10:20
03
Affirming
10:25
01
Bell Threshold
01:43
02
Redemption
10:56
03
A Place Between
09:33
04
Vector Bell Hover
02:31
05
Reflection
07:52
06
Threnody
09:50
07
Bell Hover
02:41
08
Paradise Regained
09:50

RF20001130NewYork5 - Hugh O'Donnell

RF20001130NewYork3

RF20001130NewYork4

RF20001130NewYork2 - Juliet Hanlon

RF20001130NewYork1 - Hugh O'Donnell

RF20001128NY -

Written by Terrance L Kalka
Wow
One of the very first shows I downloaded from DGM, and I still come back to it. An exemplary soundscapes performance. Part 5 is just...wow...
Written by Ron Grech
Powerfully moving
It was an excerpt from this recording - I believe released by RF in the wake of 9/11 - that awakened me to the power of soundscapes. Over the years since I downloaded the full performance, it has proven unfailing in its ability to move me. Certainly, if I wanted to introduce a friend to Fripp’s soundscapes, this is the recording I would lend them.  
Written by Christopher DeVito
Light, Shade & Dark
I downloaded this concert three months ago. After a dozen or so listens, I’m only beginning to be able to sort out and articulate my feelings about it. I’ve been trying to work my way into Soundscapes (or they’ve been working their way into me) for about 10 or 15 years now; I’ve found that my reactions tend to be somewhat unpredictable. Sometimes Fripp’s Soundscapes leave me cold, sometimes they’re depressing, sometimes they’re tremendously uplifting; often these feelings occur in rapid succession or even simultaneously. The 11/30/2000 concert feels, to me, more focused and coherent than many Soundscapes concerts. The music seems to express joy and sadness simultaneously while at the same time offering an objective and unflinching view of reality. There’s a kind of arc throughout the music, and when it’s over I feel a sense of wholeness, but also a sense of questioning and openness -- stillness and motion, completeness and yet an unsettled feeling. Not unsettled in a bad way, more a restless edge or energy, a sense that something important remains to be done. Anyway I can’t explain it better than that but I really like this music. --Chris DeVito
Written by Paul Goldschmidt
Out of the muck and into the stars
I’ve loved electronic music ever since  I heard my first TV re-run horror-movie theremin licks. Walter (Wendy) Carlos’ Switched On Bach was my formal initiation into the ranks of electronica fans. While Carlos utilized an entire studio built around a classic "switchboard"-type Moog synthesizer and multi-track analogue tape to virtually re-write the rules of classical performance, Fripp’s live improvisation in this now-lost landmark venue showers us with heavenly blue and hellfire red and every shade in between using only his trusty guitar and some sound-processing gear (certainly a far cry from the early 2-tape-deck Frippertronics setup).Would I pay cash dollars to hear a pristine version of this concert when there are freebie bootleg versions floating around? I just did, and I’ll tell you why. My bootleg edition of this concert was made from a Realaudio capture. Realaudio is a relic of the days when "streaming" meant cramming an audio stream through a 14.4Kbps dial-up modem and hoping it didn’t sound too dodgy. I still consider Realaudio to be for tin ears only. I settled for this mediocre recording of this stellar performance because barring official release, that was probably the only way I’d ever be able to hear it. Thank you, Mr. Fripp for making top-quality versions of these excellent performances available for purchase at last! Even though I now have the best-sounding available version of this performance, I still think I’ll hang onto my bootleg edition. It’ll make a wonderful drink coaster!
DISCOVER THE DGM HISTORY
.

1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s
.