On the cusp of the halfway mark supporting of Porcupine Tree, Fripp produces a set which for this particular eye witness was both beautiful and oddly unsettling.[endtease]

“Glistening arpeggios were woven into the fabric of the sonorous tones; bass notes rumbled and growled deep below the theatre; notes moving in graceful pirouettes around each other until silence swept them away” I wrote at the time.

From Robert’s dairy

A supportive audience, with restive elements, as one would anticipate from a standing floor with bars on both sides. I couldn’t trust the audience to step very far, but they were supportive of moderate treading. St. Peter’s church last Saturday, in comparison with the conventional spaces since, made very clear the tangible effect, of concentrated presence within the audience, on performing.

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TRACK
TIME
01
Threshold: Bells
01:10
02
Time Stands Still
13:31
03
Queer Jazz: Symmetrical
08:39
04
Threshold: Future Shift
00:53
05
At The End Of Time
14:34

RF20051207London1 - Robert Fripp

RF20051207London2 - Robert Fripp

RF20051207London3 - Robert Fripp

RF20051207London4 - Robert Fripp

RF20051207London5 - Robert Fripp

Written by Rafał Kosim
Only slightly behind Wolverhampton '05
To these ears(I love this phrase), was it not for the existence of Wolverhampton gig, this one would be the best of the December suite, on pair with Manchester. Briefly, I would describe London gig as "The Low End Ecstasy". Time Stands Still is a typical example of soundscapal alchemy. Starting from an uneasy place of fear, hope, love, ucertainity, and yearning(not one ’scapes review can be accurate without this word),comes a beautiful resoultion,ESPECIALLY the lower notes. It has been my number one ’scape for veery long. Queer Jazz. I love this theme. And I love its London manifestation, mainly due to the ascending low end(again!) notes, that make the piece darker and more dense, which happens somewhere in the middle, I guess. When my ears got exposed to the December Suite ’scaping style, At The End Of Time theme went soo deep into me... I grabbed nearly every gig available that had this track. I got mad, I got possessed by its, sometimes painful, beauty. Its extremely hard for me to decide which ATEOT is the one, but ultimately that honor goes for London. This one starts so painful, that it gets even scary. But the "resolution" is completely outta this world. Low end gives me an emotional orgasm, The overwhelming feeling of deep power, sadness, acceptance of destruction, and the knowing that no matter how deep the pain is, it will pass. But! I am a fan of an idea "artist knows best, so STFU!",e.g. no complaining about No-Belew-KC. Although... The aforementioned resolution goes veeery quickly silent leaving only the bell loop for c. 2 minutes, and then comes back, but slightly less audible due to another addition of bells. So whats wrong? Goddamit, the moment before the bells is one of my best sonic experiences ever, and it goes POOF! Gone. I think it needs re-editing , maybe 4 or 5 more laps, before the bell intermission, which is nice also, but too quick IMO. Maybe I’m gonna do this myself, finally. Maybe its a good idea for December Suite Collector’s Edition? Of course Robert is better at ’scaping, so maybe its just me. The last thing I should say about this gig is that I find it very hard to focus on. It requires a lot of attention, to get the joy. Like Tartu gig, but Tartu is even harder, it goes for depths of depths of my attention span.
Written by Michael Flaherty
Slow and Subtle
Initially, this concert moved me the least of any of the four from December 2005.  That changed today.  Listening to the final track in my car, VERY loud, as rain and snow began to fall, it really hit me.  This performance is, on the surface, less grabbing than others, I think, but when I really listened I heard as much depth and emotion as I have with any other soundscape.  Give this one time.  If these December Suite performances all sound too similar, keep listening.
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