The last time Robert Fripp had played this venue it had been the final gig by the Double Duo. This particular night found him kicking off the last leg of the G3 tour with Steve Vai and Joe Satriani.

Whereas previous nights on this tour had led to some sections of the audience to voice their scepticism about what Fripp was doing, the folks down Mexico way (10,000 of them in fact)seemed a tad more supportive.

One JS/SV fan by the name of Jenarom “got” what Robert was doing and perhaps why he was on the tour. “He absolutely does what he likes, the way he likes it, and doesn't have to try and be like Joe or Steve. The audience was very supportive.”

Fripp himself notes in his diary that “The audience in this town is one of the best in the world. I enjoyed this evening's Soundscapes: a strong sound from where I was sitting.”

Clocking in at just over 21 minutes, this is a short set compared to previous Fripp-related assaults on innocent G3 shred-ready ears. Yet there’s something different going on in here. The ethereal, pensive atmospheres created by the strings rumble with a darker, industrial undertow, especially in Paradise Lost.

A bite-sized chunk of other-worldly goodness for those with busy lifestyles.

AUDIO SOURCE: Direct Hard Disc

DGM AUDIO QUALITY

AVERAGE CUSTOMER RATING

TRACK
TIME
01
Bell Threshold
01:15
02
Paradise
05:17
03
Threshold Bells
00:50
04
Paradise Lost
06:31
05
Threshold Bells
01:04
06
Paradise Regained
06:33
Written by François Bussière
Short but highly effective!
The paradise lost of this recording is fantastic. Washes of strings swim over a dense and low background. The abrupt stops while the soundscap is crafted surprise and, when suddenly music pours over them, something gives me a feeling of peaceful resolution. I normally would feel that such a short concert leaves me in a state of wanting. Not here, though. In slightly more than 20 minutes, I have been taken on a deep interior voyage and the last notes of paradise regained gave me a sense of completion.
Written by Piotr Grzelec
The sonic quality of this recording is outstanding. It seems though that the time of the perfomance prevented music form further developing itself as the improvisations end quite suddenly. That didn’t spoiled their structure. The deep bass lines at the beginning of  Paradise and Paradise Regained are really well chosen comparing to those moving high-pitched sounds, that sometimes it’s hard to believe that the music is wholly improvised. But surly there must be some kind of key according to which composer places the notes, probably unaware at first of their emotional content. And there are so many moods and colors here ranging from typical dark orchestral timbres to those bright and delicate tones of the 1999 era of Soundscapes.   
DISCOVER THE DGM HISTORY
.

1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s
.