Five gigs into a 28-date tour and Crimso are on fine form in Watford on this decent quality audience recording. LTIA provides plenty of thrills and spills with the extraordinary interplay between Fripp and Wetton just before the whole band comes back in for the main theme and wind down into the violin and dulcimer duet between David Cross and Jamie Muir. With the coda still to be written, David Cross’s beautiful solo gracefully gives to way to Daily Games, as Book Of Saturday was still known at that time.

The extended improvisation begins with the ascending theme that will be familiar to listeners of the Bremen recording, splurging out into a funk-spattered workout whose violent stop-start build-up is given greater urgency as Bruford breaks out one of his trademark shuffles.

The second, though sadly truncated, major improv of the night opens and immediately the listener will recognise the arpegio that would be recycled into Fallen Angel. The assertive soloing from Cross against the motif places Crimson in a territory that wouldn’t sound out of place on an early Mahavishnu Orchestra album. Though Muir’s visual theatrics are obviously absent here, his thrashing of his kit and rig with chains comes over loud and clear in a superb Larks’ Tongues In Aspic Part 2.

Ian Wildman was at the gig and was indeed responsible for ensuring the recording eventually found its way into the archive offers this eye-witness account. "One thing I remember about the concert is the power of the band and how the audience reacted at the end-totally won over! I also recall Jamie taking most of the stage with his kit, thrashing his metal plates during Larks II. I also seem to remember he did most of the drumming during Schizoid, Bill seemed to take a back seat."

AUDIO SOURCE: Bootleg Cassette

DGM AUDIO QUALITY

AVERAGE CUSTOMER RATING

TRACK
TIME
01
Larks Tongues In Aspic Pt I
10:38
02
Book Of Saturday
03:37
03
Improv I
25:46
04
Exiles
07:16
01
Easy Money
07:58
02
Improv II
11:52
03
The Talking Drum
05:04
04
Larks Tongues In Aspic Pt II
07:55
05
21st Century Schizoid Man
07:51
Written by Jordan Clifford
Why isn't this in the box set??
It says new release on the site, but you’re telling me they put out a COMPLETE box set, promising this was the complete live recordings of the LTIA band - "known" - and they did that without figuring out what was going on with this date? Am I supposed to purchase this show now after having purchased nearly every collector’s club LTIA release and then again purchased them along with the COMPLETE RECORDINGS set? Where is the free download code for this one?
Written by Marc-andre Robitaille
Good show with mediocre audio
Setlist 5, Perfomance 5, Sound 2.5. I taught the quality of the audio would justify a second almost similar setlist with J. Muir. The audio is not that good and for I would stick with the Zoom show if I had to pick 1 of this line-up. The improv I and II are good and worth it if you have the interest and the extra $.
Written by Jonathan Wilson
Guildford remix but better
Whiskeyvengeance is quite correct; this is the same concert as Guildford but it sounds quite different. Like the notes are the same but the feel is different,and, to my bootleg-seasoned ears, much better. We have all paid loads for SW remasters, and waited in anticipation of a better defined high-hat here or there. This could easily be a different concert..just close your eyes and let the pull of our years work its magic once more. I’ve just finished listening to the LTIA boxset followed by the Starless boxset followed by the RTR boxset, filling in spaces from my collection of boots. It took me 6 months. How many more times can us old buggers keep on doing this? But we do because it is wonderful. Thank you all at DGM so very much for keeping this flame alive.
Written by Conner Hammett
Great show - but it's actually Guildford
Owners of CLUB 24 (or the Larks Tongues Complete Recordings boxset) will likely recognize the first half of this show as it is the same date previously released as Guildford 11.13.73. That version was a (rather hairy-sounding) soundboard, but this version is nearly twice as long and sounds pretty good for the vintage. Most excitingly these versions of Easy Money, Talking Drum and Larks II have never been released, nor has the second improv (though the prior releases did have a minute-long excerpt tacked on the end).
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