An old trombone, tuned bleach bottles and a sack of leaves –not the band’s backstage rider but all part of the rich tapestry of Jamie Muir’s tenure in Crimso.[endtease] The lengthy improv that makes up the bulk of this session shows the band wasn't to everyone’s liking. On their first formal performance John Wetton recalls “We were under-rehearsed, no confidence, we didn't know each other.” Yet once the musical introductions are made this TV appearance is brave and action-packed stuff. The picky Crimhead will notice that the coda to Larks’ Tongues has yet to be written let alone added to this impressive opening overture, whilst Exiles appears to be coming together rather nicely thank you very much. Short and sweet, this date is a must-have for Muir completists!
TRACK
TIME
01
Improv_The Rich Tapestry Of Life
29:50
02
Exiles
07:53
03
Larks' Tongues In Aspic Pt I
06:51

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BROWSE SHOWS WITH PHOTOS

Written by Alexander Dylan Sugar
Video is Priceless
Curious if anyone else has noticed this: there's a minute during Cross' flute solo in the improv where it almost sounds like band is playing the middle section of Sailor's Tale (think the earlier live versions where Mel took the solo instead of Fripp) until Fripp strikes a mellotron riff that, perhaps deliberately?, sends things in a different direction. Of course it's a great performance, but honestly this is not my favorite from this lineup. Larks I is still in its infancy and sounds incomp...
Written by Jose Luis Manchobas Martín
Instrumentation
As seen in the video, David Cross does not play the mellotron in any song (he does not have it) and plays the flute in "The Rich Tapestry of Life". All parts of mellotron are performed by Robert Fripp.
Written by Bob Ramstad
Previously released as CLUB 03 i.e. King Crimson Collectors Club 3
Previously released as CLUB 03 i.e. King Crimson Collectors Club 3. If you have that, you don't need this.
Written by Tove Osterling
Fantastic Performance
Muir really shines in what is most likely the highest quality recording of his time in the band, Exiles is absolutely outstanding featuring incredibly emotional vocals and great performances all around, definitely one of the greatest version of Exiles out there. Larks' Part One is still an early version without the coda, though that does nothing to lessen the impact of the performance featuring erratic and ever-changing percussion from Muir, excellent as always guitar work from Fripp, solid ...
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