Isolated tracks are always interesting to hear. Divorced from the rest of the music in which the playing sits, listening to them is akin to a series eavesdropping on a series of intimate moments between the player and the rest of the music. In this stripped back rendition of One More Red Nightmare we hear Fripp providing the melodic spine of the piece with the main guitar arpeggio that had been appearing on and off in King Crimson improvs since 1972, but which become finalised here.

In addition, we encounter Fripp as broad-sweep colourist adding light and shade; Fripp as a miniaturist introducing devices and motifs to heighten tension, as well as scratchy sparks of notes, some of which were destined never to be heard in the final mix of the finished track, but which show us some of alternative thinking and possibilities that were put into play during the recording session.

AUDIO SOURCE: Multi-Track Tapes

DGM AUDIO QUALITY

AVERAGE CUSTOMER RATING

TRACK
TIME
01
One More Red Nightmare Guitars
07:14
Written by Hubert Van Calenbergh
interesting sound
I’ve always wondered: what instrument is creating that waaaaw sound at the end of the first line? I used to think it was the large metal plate behind Bill Bruford’s drumkit, but now I’m not so sure.  
Written by Jed Schorr
clapping
I’d like to hear a version with just the drums and without all that infernal clapping. ruined the sing for me.
Written by ALLAN G OKADA
Tremendous
Extremely interesting to hear this in isolation.  Many of these unheard parts would make for a fantastic alternate remix of this track.  Wondering as well if there are any alternate takes, as it would thrill Bruford fans across the globe.  Some of the greatest drum fills ever put to tape.
Written by George Chacona
On repeated listening
By the time I listened to this for the fourth time, I am increasingly impressed by the layers of guitar that form one of the densest tunes on the album.  For a person who was within weeks of disbanding the 72-74 incarnation, Fripp was still thinking in almost painterly terms.  His layering of different voices of his guitar is awe inspiring.  This song could have been just as successful as a live power trio take with the reed and horn overdubs.  Instead Fripp was placing tones, notes, and grooves as tapestry that forms a intricately woven graft over the Drums and Bass
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