DGM Live

Moore Theatre

Well this is a treat. It’s not often on these recordings that we’ve had an introductory soundscape to tune the air. This one is rare in that it comes with short bursts of Fripp soloing in the miasmic ominous, drift of swirling chords. There’s something almost gothic about the vast space and mood it creates. Normally these things might die down but here The ConstruKction of Light suddenly bursts into the room and we’re into a very different place entirely.

After a pacy Elektrik, you can hear Belew shout “Yeah, Baby,” and Fripp responding with the Crimson honk - a vocal sound that is rumoured to be a salute or call of recognition to another soul in torment. The momentum increases significantly during Facts Of Life with Fripp’s scattergun of chordal frenzy crashing over the bar line where it would normally stop. Fripp can again be heard after an astonishing Level Five shouting “Yo!”

The dynamics between Dangerous Curves and Larks’ Tongues In Aspic Pt IV are always interesting, the one teeing up the other, which in turn brings to mind the relationship between The Talking Drum and Larks’ Tongues In Aspic Pt II. Here in Seattle Part IV sounds especially dangerous and almost out of control. The fast lines section teeter on the precipice while somehow just about maintaining their balance. Astonishing stuff, if a little vertigo-inducing at times especially when Belew comes in with his daredevil approach to soloing.
TRACK
TIME
01
Introductory Soundscape
06:58
02
The ConstruKction Of Light
08:36
03
ProzaKc Blues
05:31
04
ELEKTRIK
08:02
05
Facts Of Life
05:33
06
The Power To Believe I
01:03
07
Level Five
07:41
08
Eyes Wide Open
04:17
09
Happy With What You Have To Be Happy With
03:33
10
The Worlds' My Oyster Soup Kitchen Floor Wax Museum (Incomplete)
02:43
11
One Time
06:41
12
The Power To Believe II
07:58
13
Dangerous Curves
05:42
14
Larks' Tongues In Aspic Part IV
12:26
15
The Power To Believe III
08:21
16
Dinosaur
09:05
17
VROOOM
05:35

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