The ConstruKction of Light

Released in 2000, the 12th King Crimson studio album finds a slimmed-down quartet breaking new ground as well as retooling older themes with FraKctured and Lark’s Tongues In Aspic Part IV, both containing some of Fripp’s most terrifyingly complicated lines to date. Alongside Pat Mastelotto’s arsenal of electronic drums and Trey Gunn’s growling touch guitar, Adrian Belew’s scarily manic soloing and his penchant for surreal lyrics run riot during the roiling, skewed gait of The World’s My Oyster Soup Kitchen Floor Wax Museum. And they even Crimsonise the humble 12-bar with ProzaKc Blues. Perhaps the most surprising piece is instrumental bonus track, Heaven And Earth. A beguiling melange of haunting soundscapes and frantic, galloping beats, the final section contains one of Fripp’s most sublime, heartfelt solos on record.
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Written by Jure Humar
An underrated gem
The Construkction of Light is widely regarded as the worst King Crimson album. While I agree that it lacks the sublime beauty of the 1969-1974 albums, the quirky melodies of the 1981-1984 albums, the sheer power of Thrak and the iron grip of The Power to Believe, The Construkction of Light is a powerful Crimson album, with some of my favourite tracks of all time. The title track is an amazing composition, with Mastelotto's drumming being one of my favourites of any Crimson song. FraKctured and Larks Part IV feature some of the best guitar work of Belew and Fripp and Heaven and Earth is a hidden jewel that gives me shivers everytime I hear it. To sum it up, this is a solid entry by the mighty Crim but, at the same time, quite difficult to like. I'm glad I belong to the smaller percentage.
Written by Gustavo Ernesto
At seems a man can't supervise the construction of light after all.
The songs in this album are not bad per se. If you hear Larks IV or FraKtured live, they sound very good. But it's, without a doubt, the weakest album of King Crimson. The mix sounds odd, even bad sometimes and Belew's voice is absolutely ruined by the distortion, the only track that really sounds good is the title track. If you want to hear Crimson's electronic music done right, check the successor: The Power To Believe. Between that album and the magnificent THRAK, this fills like filler of the worst kind.
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