Greyhound Croydon England

"Totally amazing band" says a happy punter at the very end of this audience recording. Another lovely find from the recesses of the DGM archive thanks to Mister Stormy. Although not pristine audio quality this eminently listenable and previously unavailable recording captures the full Crimson set of the day. The band are on strikingly good form with Fripp’s solo on the opening sections of Sailor’s Tale being especially adventurous. There’s a wonderful reading of The Letters with a splenetic middle-section improv with furious guitar bursts and grumbling baritone sax. Ending with Boz’s voice shimmering in the same VCS3-enhanced halo that Sinfield applied to Mel’s flute at the start, Fripp has at last given up appending the track with his sickly-sweet guitar coda which often punctured the atmosphere on other live outings. Collins is on searing form as Groon builds up nice and slow, barking and roaring one minute and turning out sweetly flowing melodic lines the next; a phenomenal improviser who in some respects the band struggle to keep up with. Ian Wallace’s drum solo is beautifully constructed, again building nicely into the VCS3-processed section, though Fripp’s unaccompanied coda struggles to find any real subtance, eventually breaking down into a humourous interplay that’s greatly appreciated by the punters. After the levity of Groon, a fierce reading of Schizoid Man ups the ante with a fluidly twisting laser-beam guitar solo that’s often reminiscent of the original recording. Good fun is had ahead of The Devil’s Triangle with Fripp quoting Sleepy Lagoon better known as the theme music to the BBC’s long-running radio series Desert Island Discs hence Fripp’s quip “It’s really great to be on your show, Roy” referencing its host and creator, Roy Plomley. All in all, a great show at the Greyhound!

AUDIO SOURCE: Soundboard Cassette

DGM AUDIO QUALITY

AVERAGE CUSTOMER RATING

TRACK
TIME
01
Cirkus*
08:40
02
Pictures Of A City
09:21
03
Formentera Lady
06:28
04
The Sailors Tale
07:03
05
The Letters
05:28
06
Cadence And Cascade
04:32
01
Ladies Of The Road
07:42
02
Groon
19:31
03
21st Century Schizoid Man
09:42
04
Tune Up
02:40
05
The Devils Triangle
10:31
06
Lady Of The Dancing Water
03:14
Written by Bob Ramstad
Audio quality very good, not great, and a reasonably strong performance
Audio is a bit dark in tonality, and muffled a bit in spots. If it's a soundboard recording, there was a mic at the board to pick up some of the audience noise. I think it's much more likely that it's an audience recording and the mic is at the PA stacks. Groon ends on a laugh... it gets out there, way way way out there. Lady of the Dancing Water is a lovely (presumed) second encore. Enthusiastic crowd. There are certainly other shows from this tour with stronger performances and better audio quality. That said, this is well worth a listen, and much better than most.
Written by Gustavo Ernesto
Simply one of the very best versions of Lady of The Dancing Water
Written by Pablo Cordero
This is fire.
What a good download. This is an audience recording which sounds as good as I can imagine any bootleg sounding. The performance has an amazing levity, humor and lightness of touch, although "Pictures of a City" shows early on they can sound heavy when it is required. One of the best "Formentera Lady"s around, leading into a vicious "Sailor's Tale", now approaching its final form but still bearing a flute solo. "The Letters", as other reviewers have stated, is an extraordinary performance... Really, I feel I could go track by track heaping praise. This is a fine download. If you love this band, you'll be happy to own it.
Written by Jerry Smith
Sounds like an audience tape to me
It’s a cool recording of a really good show but it’s clearly an audience tape. The sound is really good for the era and is probably the best audience tape here from 1971. There’s a little bit of distortion in a few spots but all the instruments can be made out quite well and you can here the quiet passages. All the songs are extremely well played and even The Letters which isn’t a favorite of mine, comes across very well here.
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