All Saints Church  Broad Chalke United Kingdom
Following on from the previous evening’s performance at Wimborne Minster, Travis & Fripp decamp to Broad Chalke. Around 50 or so people gratefully exchanged the sweltering heat outdoors for All Saints’ cool stone walls and lofty wooden rafters.

Working in a productive mixture of agreed areas (such as a key or a “feel”) and complete improvisation, the performance is a delicately tightrope walk between two worlds.

Perhaps due to differences of venues, times and the occasion (this was ostensibly a fund-raiser for the local school), the music seemed lighter in tone compared to the more sombre mood struck the previous evening. That said, the appearance of soprano saxophone is almost unbearably poignant on the slowly unfurling interior travelogue of In a Field of Green

Route 23 offers a more oblique insight into their practice as notes and runs move away from each other, in cautious elliptical orbits. The Offering presents a game in three sections: writhing solo flute figures which gradually coalesce into to slow snaking loops; clipped guitar chords, and then the final section wherein Fripp unleashes some patented angular side-swipe soloing.

Perhaps the biggest surprise in this series of concerts was the inclusion of Moonchild. More of a meditation on the main theme than a cover version of the KC original.Fripp’s conversion of a single note into a soaring stratospheric-bound whistle hurtling into the blue at around 4.50 may well be reason enough to grab this gig.

Long term listeners of the Churchscape series will be especially interested in how Theo’s presence alters and enhances the End of Time themes which bring this concert to a spellbinding conclusion.

AUDIO SOURCE: Hard Drive Multi Track

DGM AUDIO QUALITY

AVERAGE CUSTOMER RATING

TRACK
TIME
01
The Apparent Chaos Of Stone
08:38
02
In A Field Of Green
07:50
03
Route 23
02:56
04
The Offering
07:14
05
Blue Calm
05:19
06
Moonchild
05:38
07
Duet For The End Of Time
07:53
08
Coda Duet For The End Of Time
06:12

TF20090521Broadchalke3 - Trev Wilkins

TF20090521Broadchalke6 - DGM Art Department

TF20090521Broadchalke9 - DGM Art Department

TF20090521Broadchalke1 - Trev Wilkins

TF20090521Broadchalke2 - Trev Wilkins

TF20090521Broadchalke4 - Trev Wilkins

TF20090521Broadchalke5 - DGM Art Department

TF20090521Broadchalke7 - DGM Art Department

TF20090521Broadchalke8 - DGM Art Department

Written by Christopher DeVito
New music
This is a beautiful collaboration. The expansion of textures provided by flute and sax take the soundscapes to another place, and Travis and Fripp really seem to be listening to each other. Highlights from this concert, for me, include In Field of Green, which features a nice straight-ahead guitar solo, very melodic; The Offering, which has a bluesy flute intro and builds to some good old electric guitar playing, soaring and swooping; and Moonchild, which builds from a delicate intro to some intense electric guitar. Great stuff.
Written by Michael Wilbur-Ham
Almost perfect
Having not heard Thread, it was a real pleasure to hear Travis & Fripp for the first time. Moonchild is a very pleasant and fun diversion! I have only given this four stars because I felt that this recording is a victim of the Loudness wars. Of course I don’t mean that this is the highly compressed garbage that has become far too common, and has turned music into aural wallpaper (you can’t listen to it, but it makes good background). The other end of the Loudness war is that when mastering it is becoming "normal" to compress more than would have been done in the past, and if this compression is mild compared to most other recordings, the mild compression is seen as being ok. So whilst this recording is very listenable, due to the mild compression it has, for me, lost the "I’m listening to real instruments" feeling. And when there are natural instruments like flute and sax, a feeling or reality can make a huge difference. Perhaps I am totally wrong, and this recording accurately captures the live sound. But if compression is to blame for my slight disappointment, I very much hope that DGM resists the temptation to compress as much, or perhaps provides audiophiles the option of an uncompressed FLAC. Don’t let my comments put anyone off buying this disc. Most people will not hear anything wrong with this recording, and even though I find the sound slightly less than perfect, I’m still pleased I bought it.
Written by David F Snyder
a different set of threads
8 improvs of very high quality.  I can hear: two themes that come from Thread, one from Soundscapes, and one from ITCOCK, but there are many excellent surprises (RF is ever-creative) as well and superbly played.The two players have excellent communication and rapport throughout, being quite up to the challenge of slow-paced group improvisation.The sound quality is excellent. The tempos of  the pieces are decidedly mellow. I like the sound and feel of this even better than Thread, which is still an excellent collaboration as well.
Written by paul duffy
stunningly beautiful
for someone who rarely looks back, and especially as far back as the song "Moonchild," Fripp with colleague Travis have delivered a work of breathtaking beauty, especially with "moonchild." I had beeen driving along the bridge connecting New Brunswicke and PEI a little after midnight and just stopped, got out of the car and watched the moon and its reflection in the Gulf, a moment of grace.....
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