How best to describe the performance here? One word: savage.[endtease] Taken from the FOH tapes recorded by Greg Dean and mixed with audience mics from the Multi-track ADATS by Alex Mundy, this is a powerful testament to the latitude and grasp of the Double Duo in the live arena. Level Five squashes all before it, packing in more musical weight and density into seven minutes than many groups manage over an entire career. A high-powered and potent version of Facts Of Life makes for compelling listening – the revved up solo from Fripp is a joy to behold as is Belew’s rollercoaster solo on LTIA IV. EleKtriK also has more bite than the album version and even though there’s a odd brown moment or two, it grabs the limelight. Of course with Crimson it’s not just a case of being big and clever with kick-ass moves. There’s a spell-binding performance of Power To Believe II (or Power Circle as they called it backstage) in which the yearning of a lifetime in music is poured into the deep dark well of those graceful notes. Despite a dodgy sound check, Fripp observes in his diary that the show “…began well & got better.” With Tony Levin watching in the wings, Ade prophetically signs off with “Thank you you’ve been a great audience. See you…probably never.” Just four days later Trey left the band.

AUDIO SOURCE:

DGM AUDIO QUALITY

AVERAGE CUSTOMER RATING

TRACK
TIME
01
The Power To Believe I
00:52
02
Level Five
07:21
03
The ConstruKction Of Light
08:55
04
Facts Of Life
06:03
05
EleKtriK
08:16
06
The Power To Believe II
08:07
07
Dinosaur
06:20
08
One Time
06:50
01
Happy With What You Have To Be Happy With
04:54
02
Dangerous Curves
05:45
03
Larks Tongues In Aspic Part IV
11:52
04
The Power To Believe III
08:06
05
Red
06:38

KC20031114Kingston6 - Robert Fripp

KC20031114Kingston5 - Robert Fripp

KC20031114Kingston4 - Robert Fripp

KC20031114Kingston3 - Robert Fripp

KC20031114Kingston2 - Robert Fripp

KC20031114Kingston1 - Robert Fripp

KC20031114Kingston7 - Adam Aronson

KC20031114Kingston8

Written by William Jenks
Double Duo Domination
An excellent show, with Brutal and Savage both being good descriptors. LTIA IV is revelation. An excellent choice to download.
Written by Wendell Hutchins
8 stars if I could!
Of all the concerts I have heard through DGM and KCCC this is the best one since John Wetton was in the band. The crunchy stuff like Happy With What You Have is very forceful, the delicate passages are feathery delicate, the intricate passages are crisply and confidently executed; but it is not by any means a robotic performance, it breathes life and energy; the gents were on fire this night, and you can almost perceive, somehow, they were well aware of it. If this was Trey’s last or next to last concert with KC it was a great way to leave us wanting more and wondering. Again, if you are a fan of any KC lineup since the ’74 breakup you MUST hear this one!
Written by Rik Schraag
Stellar
A great performance. Wonderful interlocking guitars. There are moments when I find myself thinking "Don’t stop". And they don’t.
Written by Jack Floyd
2003's Mighty Crim Power
This is the essential and most powerful concert from 2003. Here, all the four musicians show extreme brutal force, virtuosity and technique. Although there are some bad moments and warts, the whole show is ferocious, presenting the band in awesome form. The set opens with The Power To Believe I, which serves the purpose of previewing and beginning the assault. Level Five has a smashing power of destruction and The ConstruKction Of Light is dreamy and complex. However, this dazzling climax is broken by the striking lines of Facts Of Life and it’s dynamic atmosphere. EleKtriK, even with some clams is superior than it’s studio counterpart, The Power To Believe II has a haunting and dark beauty that’s dooming and hopeful in the same time. This performance of Dangerous Curves is possibly it’s most brutal and fearsome rendition to date. Larks’ IV is a real beast, as well as Fripp’s and Belew’s solos in it. This concert presents what’s likely to be the best performance ever of The Power To Believe III , Gunn’s solo at it’s climax sends shivers down the spine. Red is probably the best way to end a KC gig, and that’s what happens here. Savage indeed...
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