Jazz Cafe London England
Three nights into the experiment and there are points in the show where spirits sag a little and the muse is elusive. 3i1 is perhaps typical – sometimes coming together in dramatic manner then the various elements polarise and fall away. However, you'd be wrong to jump to any quick conclusions when it comes to this music. Take 3i2 for example. There’s a palpable uncertainty when it starts off and a cursory listener might be tempted to dismiss it and move onto something else. Yet it soon builds over one of Bruford’s enthralling rhythmic patterns and soundscape washes with Levin and Gunn each inserting small motifs to propel it into a sustained high-paced attack – Gunn’s solo is a jaw-dropper and the track turns out to be one of the highlights of the entire series of concerts. Who’d have thought it would turn out like that from that intro?
In the second set there’s a more consistent approach when it comes to netting the muse. 3ii3 demonstrates the importance of gaps and silence in this kind of music with Bruford supporting events via his patented brand of “admirable restraint.” 3ii4 rocks along with a snarling bass line from Levin, soaring and sweeping fuzz-tone exchanges from Gunn and Fripp, with Bruford constantly taking the rhythmic pulse and then moving it at will. The night finishes with a spectacular flourish with Bill getting things underway with the drum machine at a blistering tempo, Levin, the calm space inside all the fury, holds the groove with an iron grip as Gunn and Fripp do their thang.
Overall the third night wobbles a little more than the others but eventually balances itself out. Of course that element of hazard is in the very nature of these improvised shows, and if the musicians are prepared to take the risk then shouldn’t we?

AUDIO SOURCE: Adat Multi-Track

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TRACK
TIME
01
3 i 1
10:54
02
3 i 2
10:56
03
3 i 3
07:48
04
3 i 4
08:28
05
3 i 5
09:56
01
3 ii 1
04:39
02
3 ii 2
08:57
03
3 ii 3
05:27
04
3 ii 4
07:32
05
3 ii 5
07:55
06
3 ii 6
08:27
07
3 ii 7
08:05

P119971203London1

P119971203London2

P119971203London3

P119971203London4

BROWSE SHOWS WITH PHOTOS

Written by William Jenks
Some very interesting moments - an experimental night
I agree with the blurb that this show is a bit more all over the place than the first two nights' shows. 3i2, as it describes, however, rewards the patient listener. This is a slowly evolving piece, with evolving lines from percussion, base, guitar all having their featured moments. There are some non-traditional sounding pieces, like 3i4's jazzy-piano sound on top of that familiar pseudo-pipe-organ soundscape, until some 70s guitar god jumps in. It might not be every day listening, but it's a trip. Not mentioned in the blurb is 3i5, which also has some fairly radical sound experimentation and a feature piece to this listener. 3ii4 and 3ii7 are highlights of the second set, with the latter being just short of a hook to turn it into a true development piece for the band. Betwixt are palate cleansers of various sorts. This set has Bruford and Levin in fine form.
Written by Christopher DeVito
Jazz Cafe 12/03/97
The ProjeKcts were presented as "research and development" arms of King Crimson, but I quickly found that I had no interest in listening to them on those terms. Instead, I simply listen to each ProjeKct on its own terms, as a musical end in itself. The ProjeKcts were primarily improvising groups; this means the tunes don’t always (or even often) lead to a "proper" resolution, or follow the rules of composition -- or even "good taste" (the enemy of art). This is a positive attribute. ProjeKct One feels, to me, like the most fully realized of the ProjeKcts. I think that each of the eight sets played and recorded over this four-night gig is a great album in itself and the whole thing would make a great eight-disc box set. (Actually I made my own 12-disc set, adding an 80-minute "best of" disc for each night.) December 3 has a lot of variety in its two sets. Highlights, for me, include 3i1 (or, "Industry, Pt. 5"), which goes from quiet menace to upbeat groove-metal; the brilliant 3i2 ("Rough Sea, Red Sky"), which I consider to be a timeless Crimson classic that would fit nicely with any Crimson group since 1972; 3i3 ("Disturbing News from L5/Rat Patrol on Mars"), with Levin’s chunky bowed bass and Bruford’s martial beat; 3i5 ("Red Fog/Swirl"), with a meditative-metal solo from Fripp that dissolves in ascending and whirling soundscapes; 3ii2 ("Big Bass Beat"), with Gunn and Fripp rocking over the Levin-Bruford big beat; the quietly intense 3ii3 ("Atmospheres Rising"); 3ii4 ("Fuzzy Bear"), with one of Levin’s patented monster-bass intros and more searing leaded-glass guitar lines from Gunn and Fripp; and 3ii7 ("Cheese Bags"), a rocker with a very nice coda of swirling soundscapes. P1 was a great band, and we’re lucky all four nights at the Jazz Cafe were recorded, since the group was a one-off. If you have any appreciation for the improvising side of Crimson, I think you’ll really like ProjeKct One (and all the other ProjeKcts). --Chris DeVito
Written by Danny Anderson
Pig Heaven
After listening to this seires of concerts several years back (from recordings of indeterminate origin) this was my favorite ProjeKct.  This outing shows the willingness to teeter on the edge (succeding or failing) in the same fashion as the LTIA band. Surprisingly DGM has released the full set and I am officially in Pig Heaven.  Ahhhh... Yours,Dan
Written by Martyn Capel
Nice Show
I always enjoy all of the releases on DGM Live, and this is no exception.  A great listen.  It’s also great how DGM is doing this and all of their releases right.  Hats off to all involved!Martyn
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