Alex Mundy has painstakingly restored the concert experience by matching the surviving original reels with audience recordings to provide us with a close approximation of Fripp's concert and lecture tour.

"At the moment there are some very interesting developments are happening inside music in our culture. Three areas have developed which are more developed and available and accessible to us now more so than they were ten years ago. These areas are one, the discovery and publication of wide repertoires of early music. Secondly, electronic music - Keith Emerson leapt naked out of bed in 1970 with his newly acquired wife to demonstrate to me the Moog synthisiser he’d just acquired. Well, nowadays I don’t think anyone would leapt out of bed on such an auspicious occasion as that to demonstrate a synthisiser for me because it’s simply more accepted...and the third area, we’ve become far more aware of so-called ethnic music; African, Indian music...and even European folk music. I take a keen interest in all of these."

AUDIO SOURCE: Official Cassette And Quarter Inch Reel And Bootleg

DGM AUDIO QUALITY

AVERAGE CUSTOMER RATING

TRACK
TIME
01
Loop I
05:01
02
Loop II
05:52
03
Loop III
07:53
04
Loop IV
09:02
05
Lecture Pt I*
42:03
01
Loop I And Solo
05:09
02
Loop II And Solo
06:19
03
Lecture Pt II*
17:49
04
Loop III And Solo
08:07
05
Loop IV And Solo
08:58
Written by Frank Hadlich
Does humor belong to music?
Frank Zappa asked once, and it used to happen that humor in music and the music of King Crimson - Robert Fripp do not encounter frequently.This Fripperlecture is on of those days humor and music met. The audience and the artist seem to have been in the "right" mood. On addition, if you pick this release, you will receive a fine British English training for free. A lot of the vocabulary found its way to my training cards, and I try to get hold on some of the very special phrases in my mind to be dropped into a conversation from time to time.
Written by David F Snyder
Lovely bleeps and drones
The last two pieces are worth the price of admission. The last piece has some nice soloing over an interesting throbbing bed of puissant tones. Even on the earlier pieces, it’s quite cool to hear the layering of individually non-compelling bleeps build up into beautiful melodic phrases. This Georgetown musical performance is in some ways more visceral and exploratory than the Princeton performance 3 days prior. The Princeton performance (or at least the recording of it) doesn’t have much soloing over the loops as this one does, for one thing. I find that it adds quite a bit of life to the whole performance. Robert had to work harder to engage the audience with the lecture at first ("temerity"), but he did a great job at being welcoming and trusting the good will of the audience. There was no one calling him "Bob" here, not that I heard at least, and I can tell this goodwill helped strengthen the performance. More is possible when we work together.
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