DGM Live

Red

Recorded at the end of two lengthy tours of the USA in 1974, the final album of the 1970s finds King Crimson in an raw and uncompromising mood. Consisting of Crimson founder guitarist Robert Fripp, bassist and vocalist John Wetton and drummer Bill Bruford, the trio serve up a sound that’s metal-edged, gritty and powerful. Opening with the classic bulldozer instrumental title track, the album contains a typically eclectic mix that includes the jazzy rock of Fallen Angel, the punchy attack of One More Red Nightmare, the unsettling but dazzling near-telepathic improvisation of Providence and the stirring anthem, Starless whose opening ballad section gives way to a moving and emotional climax that is frequently cited as the ultimate King Crimson listening experience.

AUDIO SOURCE: Multitrack

DGM AUDIO QUALITY

AVERAGE CUSTOMER RATING

TRACK
TIME
01
Red
06:16
02
Fallen Angel
06:03
03
One More Red Nightmare
07:10
04
Providence
08:10
05
Starless
12:16
Written by Gustavo Ernesto
This is how an dying band sounds
Red was the last record of the Eclipse era. Thought John Wetton says he had no idea the band was going to end after that record (since they planned to make another album with McDonald) everything here suggests otherwise. Full with heavy, powerful songs. All of them about losing something, it portrays a tired Fripp, whit him and the other bandmates doing everything they can to continue the experience, but failing in doing so. Something tells me they all knew, one way or another, that this was their last work in King Crimson, so they decided to make their most powerful record yet. Some people say, Iron Maiden, Metallica or Motorhead have the best metal album. But that recognition belongs to King Crimson, in their album "Red"
Written by Ray Infussi
Powerful
Released when I was a kid, I was introduced to KC by my uncle who had me listen to ITCOKC. As more prog was introduced, I got to Red. Red...a fitting title to a passionate record. I still come back to it frequently, now in my 50s. Admittedly, I could listen to John Wetton (RIP) read the phone book, but the interplay between the 3 players & the power of the songs is gripping. Still my favorite KC album.
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